Connecting Indigenous Communities

Indigenous communities across Canada and the United States are amongst the most underserved when it comes to high quality internet access. It is well established that reliable internet service is a key enabler of economic development, entrepreneurship and SMEs, as well as much needed health and education services.   Yet the rural and remote locations typical of Indigenous communities present critical challenges in delivering reliable and affordable internet services. In this session, a panel of experts and members of Indigenous communities will explore key challenges as well as recent successful network deployments in Indigenous communities.

Yet the rural and remote locations typical of Indigenous communities present critical challenges in delivering reliable and affordable internet services. In this session, a panel of experts and members of Indigenous communities will explore key challenges as well as recent successful network deployments in Indigenous communities.

Speakers:


John Kealoha Garcia

John Kealoha Garcia is an entrepreneur and award-winning creative director based in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Known for his role in building impactful creative for Hawaii’s most influential organizations, John’s forward-thinking leadership and ability to move ideas from concept to completion has contributed to his success over the past 20 years in the industry.

Voted one of Hawaii’s top social media influencers, with design accolades from the Society of Professional Journalism (SPJ) and the American Advertising Federation (AAF) — John’s mindful approach to user experience and keen attention to cross-cultural values bring a fresh perspective to the organizations he serves daily.

In addition to incubating ideas at his creative think tank, Garcia Haus, John serves as executive advisor for the Nation of Hawaii, contributing to the restoration of the sophisticated religion, language and culture of the Native Hawaiian people, who prior to the overthrow, lived in a highly organized, self-sufficient, subsistent social system based on Communal Land Tenure.